Persuasive Picks for the week of 08/09/09

EasyBake OvenCooking Social Media with an EasyBake Oven vs. a Viking Range
Chip Griffin from MediaBullseye.com shares an entertaining comparison when getting ready to “cook up” some social media.

CEOs Say: How To Be An Executive Blogger
Good stories and advice for CEOs looking to blog or just to become better bloggers.

10 Ways to Archive Your Tweets
Did you know that your Tweets aren’t really searchable forever? ReadWriteWeb’s Sarah Perez shares 10 ways to back them up.

Five ways to help your CEO embrace social media
A little post from “down-under” that gives some advice on how to get the top brass on board with your social media strategy.

Why Facebook Wants FriendFeed
Om Malik shares his point of view on why Facebook’s acquisition of Friendfeed is not about Twitter but more about Google.

Persuasive Picks for the week of 08/02/09

TechRadium vs. TwitterTwitter Sued for Patent Infringement – and it doesn’t look good
How would your online social interactions change if Twitter suddenly went away? We may soon find out.

The 10 Rock Solid Elements of Effective Online Marketing
Snag this free PDF written by Copyblogger founder Brian Clark, and find out more about the importance of building online authority.

Social Media Marketing Spend to Hit $3.1 Billion by 2014
Forrester‘s new Interactive Marketing Forecast for the next five years shows healthy growth that will out-pace email and mobile, but naturally, still won’t top traditional ad spends.

Time to Replace your Online News Room with Facebook!
The term “online newsroom” was all the buzz a year or two ago. Paul Dunay argues in favor of ditching a home-grown news room to go with Facebook pages, as a free alternative with better exposure. Read his post on MPDailyFix.com

Community Netiquette: How to Avoid Stepping on Virtual Toes
Community Guy Jake McKee shares some of the basics for proper conduct in online communities – especially when representing your company.

Whiny WashPost Reporter Makes His Point: Respect the Genuine Article (Or, Is Gawker Destroying Journalism?)

Okay we’re not Gawker but I couldn’t resist using the headline that Ian Shapira, a reporter for The Washington Post, suggested to them for a story he wrote about how outlets like Gawker are killing journalism.

Aptly titled, “The Death of Journalism (Gawker Edition),” Shapira writes about how he was at first elated when Gawker, “the snarky New York culture and media Web site,”  blogged about his story in that day’s Washington Post. However – after showing the coup to his editor who replied, “They stole your story. Where’s your outrage, man?” – he began to grow more and more “disenchanted with the journalism business.”

In an effort to not also steal and reprint Shapira’s story, I’ll just link to it for you to read in full. The reason I mention the story here is that, as PR professionals, it’s important for us to pay attention not only to what reporters are writing and working on, but what they are facing in their own industry. (Shapira’s lament on how long it took him to research and write the article, as compared to how long it took Gawker to write their synopsis of it – and what the income for such a Gawker reporter is – is particularly interesting.)

work-hard

As our own industry has been under fire lately, so too has that of the media – one of the biggest and most important constituents to a PR professional’s job. We need to pay attention – the transparent nature of the Internet – particularly digital content and social media – is shifting the careers of both journalists and PR executives, and it will be interesting to see where we all end up.

In fact, another recent example of this shifting landscape came in the form of  YouTube’s “News Near You” – explained in this New York Times article today. “News Near You” allows news outlets that have signed up with YouTube to post news packages and split the revenue from the advertisements that appear with them. 

If you’d like to further explore the topic of journalism’s shifting landscape (in particular, of course, “how Gawker is destroying journalism”), Ian Shapira will be online to chat with readers at 11 a.m. Tuesday. You are invited to submit your questions before or during the discussion.