Persuasive Picks – Week of August 17, 2015

Is Marketing on Twitter Worth the Investment”, authored by Huffington Post contributor, Jayson DeMers, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using Twitter, from hashtags to personalization. DeMers reminds us that Twitter is a constantly evolving platform, and it has many new functionalities in the works.

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The popular topic of consumer behavior is covered in a MarketingProfs article called “Harness the Power of Personas for Social Media Marketing”. This article, authored by Keith Quesenberry, offers insight on creating personas to increase the relevancy of your social media marketing methods.

Forbes contributor, Cheryl Conner, talks about PR mistakes and successes in an article called “When PR Goes Really Right (Or Dead Wrong)”. She offers examples of entrepreneurs who took a chance on a unique PR strategy and it either bombed or created a real buzz.

Persuasive Picks – Week of July 27, 2015

Business2Community author, Anna Rodriguez pens an article called “The Good And The Devil Benefits of Virtual And Social Media Management”. The article focuses on the recent survey from WorldatWork that found found that the number of American employees who worked virtually at least one day a month reached 17.2 million in 2008. The article goes on to offer tips on managing a virtual workforce effectively. 6-ways-to-manage-a-virtual-work-force   ‘Why You Need To Diversify Your Marketing”, written by Forbes contributor, Mike Templeman, offers insight on why companies need to consider more than one channel in their marketing efforts. Once a company finds their marketing channel where they can achieve traction, it is incumbent upon that company to seek out and establish and second, third, or fourth effective marketing channel. Business2Community also covers the topic of storytelling in marketing in its article called “Using Storytelling in Your Software & Technology Marketing.  Author Stephanie Kapera discusses how storytelling in campaigns and videos as well as blogs offers marketers a chance to have their customers understand them better. Kapera also offers tips on when storytelling is not appropriare.

Persuasive Picks – Week of July 13, 2015

Forbes contributor, Theo Priestly pens a story discussing the challenges marketers face in these fast paced times. “Marketing: 3 Reasons To Tell A Story, Not Sell Technology” states that organizations need to turn their attention more towards storytelling and explains how to approach this task effectively. storytelling-18642-3-1940x1293   TheNextWeb’s article called “5 Social Media Fails and the Apps That Could Have Saved Them”, points out various social media mistakes by well known brands such as DiGiorno, New England Patriots and McDonalds. It offers insight on the apps that could have helped these brands when human error could not have been avoided. shutterstock_171257771 Justin Lafferty authors an article for AdWeek’s Social Times called “Was Amazon’s #PrimeDay a Social Media Failure?”, delving in to the success of this social media campaign. Though Amazon said that Prime Day sales surpassed Black Friday or 2014, a lot of the chatter around the sale event was negative or bland, according to Talkwalker.

Persuasive Picks – Week of June 15, 2015

Forbes contributor, John Rampton, shares 10 SEO Tips For Marketing Your Startup in 2015. Check out his ideas on how to keep it simple and focus on target key words and upfront research. According to Rampton, the new face of the Internet requires a fresh strategy when it comes to developing SEO that works to keep your business relevant in search engine results.

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Recent research by Wayin finds that real-time marketers are funneling more money toward such tactics (RTM), and they’re reaping the benefits. This emarketer article called As Real-Time Marketing ROI Increases, Spending Follows evidences that Real-time marketers are in it for the relationships, event promotion.

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Rounding out the week with a little humor, PR veteran pens an opinion piece for PRWeek called In praise of the PR chaos, which pokes fun at the industry. Author Lottë Jones explains the glamorous life of PR to college students.

 

“Effective Executive” Series with Eric Newman, VP Products & Marketing, Digby

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We are pleased to share another insightful “Effective Executive” interview with Eric Newman, Vice President of Products & Marketing for Digby.  In this role, Eric Newman helps brands leverage the power of Localpoint, a cross channel marketing platform. During his 18-year career, Eric has ridden the cutting edge of a number of online revolutions at a successful startups, including Demand Media’s Pluck, Powered, IBM’s DataBeam, Ask Jeeve’s Direct Hit and Motive Corporation’s Question Technologies. He holds a M.B.A. from the Kellogg School at Northwestern University and a B.A. in Information Systems and Marketing from the University of Cincinnati.

Eric shared his thoughts on location-based marketing behavior and which loyalty programs top his list.  He also shared his insights with us on why Austin has become such a growing city for tech companies, especially start ups.

What’s the challenge in attaining a location-based marketing strategy?

Using time and place as a real-time trigger for marketing, engagement and customer service in brick and mortar locations adds a whole new dimension to an organization’s marketing and operational thinking – and therein lies the challenge.  It starts with figuring out how you want to react to a consumer’s entry into a store, or presence in a target neighborhood – notifying associates of the consumer’s entry or sending a visit-encouraging message to the consumer as examples.  From there, the retailers we work with are using that real-world event as a key juncture for mapping the consumer’s cross-channel history – understanding that they shopped on the ecommerce site last night and are likely entering the store to put their hands on the product before making the purchase.  That kind of omni-channel use is where location really shines as the link between the on and offline worlds, but it is also the most challenging for an organization to adopt when typically those worlds were organizationally separated in the past.

What have you seen over the last year in terms of measured success of a good location-based marketing strategy?

We have witnessed some amazing results.  While we cannot speak to specific customers’ performance metrics, we can talk about campaigns where 60+% of consumers in neighborhoods near a store opened a location-based announcement with push notification set up by the marketer and then in turn, visited the nearby store to redeem the offer.  We’ve seen social check-in campaigns through the retailer’s app generate astounding redemption rates as consumers walked into the store, received an offer and then shared the offer with their friends.

What are some of the best loyalty programs you’ve seen for customers?

As a marketer I really appreciate the Kohl’s cash program.  Giving consumers discounts they can apply against any product in a virtual cash format makes it easy to earn and easy to spend those points, but all within Kohl’s stores.

As a consumer, I like loyalty programs that offer something a little different as a loyalty reward.  Using earned loyalty points at a grocery like Randall’s to get a steep discount on gas at their fueling station is significant enough to actually spur conversation about it at the family dinner table.  Any time you can get someone teaching their children about a loyalty program, that’s longevity.

What’s your dream customer – i.e., who could use some improvement with Digby?

Location context as a trigger to more relevantly market and engage the consumer is not limited to one vertical or most appropriate for just one customer.  We see interest in Digby from brands in many sectors – from hospitality to dining and even sports franchises – anyone who has a physical place of business and would like to better engage their customers.  Interestingly, we learn new use cases for our technology with every potential customer we meet.  One of my favorite unexpected use cases was a convenience store chain that builds 50-100 stores a year.  That’s millions of dollars of real-estate investment where building on the wrong spot can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars of missed revenue.  In this case, the retailer wanted to identify locations where they were considering store development, and use the knowledge of how many of their app-holding, loyal customers drive by these various locations as a set of decision input into their real estate evaluation.

What’s the connection with mobile apps to successful in-store service?

There are so many use cases around customer service where awareness that the customer is at the store is so important.  For example, a fast food restaurant wants to allow consumers to order their burgers online for pickup in the restaurant.  Doesn’t sound all that complicated until you realize that a fast food sandwich has about a two minute shelf life under the heat lamps.  Get caught at a red light on the way to the store for pickup, and they have to start the order all over again.  Instead, the restaurant wants to use our Localpoint platform to know when the remote ordering customer has entered the parking lot and place the order into the queue at that moment – ensuring a burger ready to go with minimal waste.

Any predictions for 2014 in terms of marketing behavior, from a B to B or B to C standpoint?

Location is becoming white hot right now as organizations see the relevancy and depth it can add to their customer relationships, and the ROI it can drive in terms of incremental store visits, conversion and cart size growth.  Generally speaking, this technology applies best to the B to C experience, given the nature of shopping behavior where consumers visit malls, stores and other retail locations.

Weigh in on Austin and its growth in the tech world – how would you say Austin has changed over the year climate-wise for tech companies?

Austin is an incredible place for technology and has been for many years.  A startup community increases in velocity as it builds momentum with entrepreneurs at all organizational levels building startups and then facilitating the sale and integration of the startup into larger technology companies.  This creates a powerful secondary effect of drawing larger companies into Austin and then setting up the entrepreneur to make a run at their next big idea.  Austin has been doing this successfully for 20 years and has mature, fertile field of technology companies and startups spanning from the B to C space, like MapMyFitness who recently announced acquisition by UnderArmour, to B to B and even hardware solutions.  The whole city has adopted tech as a mainstay of the economy and culture and the tech companies fit right into the “Keep Austin Weird” message we are known for.

Have you gone to SXSW? What’s your experience or viewpoint on it as a value for organizations or evangelists?

SXSW is an amazing mix of digital technology, media, movies and music.  However, its meteoric growth has moved well beyond its roots as an interactive conference to an expansive showcase.  The biggest challenge is navigating the breadth of things you can do during the show, ranging from actually learning something in session, to hobnobbing with the digital elite, to immersing yourself in the non-stop party swirling around the event.  You need a SXSW plan of action before stepping foot into the show and sign up for the sessions you need as early as possible to ensure attendance.

Top marketing outlets you read?

Being all mobile, all the time, I spend most of my reading budget on sites like Mobile Commerce Daily and the Location Based Marketing Association.  I augment that with industry specific sites like Stores Magazine and Advertising Age.  As a technology product guy, I cannot live without Business Insider or our Forrester relationship, as industry analysts give a deep, cross-vendor view of the world that is hard to find from more traditional industry media publications.